Amazon lands an exclusive NFL playoff game for streaming next season

Amazon is getting its turn to exclusively stream an NFL playoff game.

The tech giant will carry a wild-card game during the 2024-25 season, according to people familiar with the plan who were not authorized to comment. The game provides an opportunity for Amazon to bring a massive audience to its Prime video platform.

The NFL declined to comment on the move. An Amazon representative did not respond to a request for comment.

NBC carried a wild-card game on its Peacock service on Jan. 13, delivering what it called the largest live streaming audience in history with an average audience of 23 million viewers. It’s likely the game, a Kansas City Chiefs victory over the Miami Dolphins with pop superstar Taylor Swift cheering them on, helped Peacock add substantially to the 30 million subscriber total it has reported to Wall Street analysts.

COMPANY TOWN

In his last Super Bowl, CBS’ Sean McManus reflects on ‘the ultimate TV drama’

Feb. 8, 2024

Amazon recently finished its second season as the exclusive home of “Thursday Night Football,” which saw a 24% increase in audience compared with the prior year, averaging nearly 12 million viewers according to Nielsen data. The streamed games reach a substantially younger audience than the ones airing on traditional television.

Amazon is getting the playoff game next season due to a performance clause in its exclusive deal to carry the NFL’s Thursday night package.

Like all NFL games, the playoff telecast will be available on broadcast television in the markets of the teams competing in the contest.

ADVERTISEMENT

But it will be the first playoff game in NFL history to primarily air on a platform not owned by one of the legacy media companies that have carried the NFL over the last 30 years.

The Amazon deal comes several days after Walt Disney Co., Warner Bros. Discovery and Fox Corp. — all of which NFL are media partners — announced plans to launch a subscription streaming service that will carry cable and broadcast networks with live sports programming. The still-to-be-named service is expected to be up and running by mid-August, in time for NFL exhibition games.

MORE TO READ

COMPANY TOWNENTERTAINMENT & ARTSSPORTS

Newsletter

Inside the business of entertainment

The Wide Shot brings you news, analysis and insights on everything from streaming wars to production — and what it all means for the future.Enter email addressSIGN ME UP

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Stephen Battaglio writes about television and the media business for the Los Angeles Times out of New York. His coverage of the television industry has appeared in TV Guide, the New York Daily News, the New York Times, Fortune, the Hollywood Reporter, Inside.com and Adweek. He is also the author of three books about television, including a biography of pioneer talk show host and producer David Susskind.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *