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the man he rescued and his family. Not to be intrusiv

JENKINS, PA — Former Cinnaminson Police Officer Michael Walowy and his friend George Hockins shared a car ride Sunday that neither will likely forget soon, if ever.
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The trip that would take them from the southern tier of New York State to their homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, via the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, had been taken multiple times before.

Walowy and Hockins, a truck driver by trade, would normally stay in New York until Monday when they made these weekend trips, but Walowy told Patch this time was different.

“They were calling for thunderstorms on Monday. So we decided to come home early,” he said.

The pair were about halfway between Wilkes-Barre and Scranton when Walowy said something else unusual happened, this time involving the car in front of them and its male driver.

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“All of a sudden, he veered off to the right, he struck the guardrail … we didn’t see any brake lights and he just kept going like he had his foot on the gas,” Walowy said. “He continued onto the grass up this incline, [hit] a berm or some type of a large bump in the ground, went airborne, landed and impacted a tree.”

Walowy said he and Hockins, who were driving parallel to the man’s path along the turnpike until the other driver crashed, thought the man had fallen asleep behind the wheel.

After Walowy called emergency dispatchers for help, he noticed a more urgent concern than ascertaining what led the driver to veer off the path that needed to be addressed.

“His car doors would not open,” he said of the car that crashed. “We were finally able to get the passenger side door open. We tried to pull him over the center console but he wasn’t budging … he was [incoherent] in his seat, which was jammed up against a steering wheel.”

The daunting task became even more frightening, according to Walowy.

“The grass had caught fire underneath the car … and it was burning up into the engine compartment,” he said. “We pulled him out of the car as the flames were coming up under the dash and up against the windshield … and then the whole car went up.”

He said a Pennsylvania Turnpike Authority worker, a person driving south on the turnpike, a couple who was also driving south on the turnpike — one of whom was a nurse, according to Walowy — as well as a fire department based nearby, a Pennsylvania State Trooper and local emergency medical response team all either stopped or responded to help.

Ultimately, the emergency medical response team took the man whose car crashed to the hospital.

Even so, Walowy said the harrowing experience left him shaking for the rest of the ride home.

The Moorestown native added that very few things he did while with the Cinnaminson Police Department from 1988 to 2009 (and with the Bordentown City Police Department from 1983 to his accepting the position in Cinnaminson) came close to what he and Hockins saw and did Sunday.

“My partner and I responded to a house fire [in Bordentown], made entry into the house and we got the owner and three dogs out,” Walowy said. “That was probably the only thing that was ever remotely close to this.”
Walowy was told the driver of the crashing car had a medical emergency and was listed in “fair” condition at a hospital in the Wilkes-Barre area. He said privacy laws keep him from learning other details.

(By several accounts, including nursa.org and a Florida newspaper, agreed that generally speaking, “fair” condition means that although a patient may be somewhat uncomfortable, his or her vital signs are within “normal limits” and the patient’s outlook is “favorable.”)

Walowy said several things about the events that unfolded on Sunday stand out a bit more than the others.

“I was … disappointed with the number of people who just kept driving by while we were out there trying to get this guy out of the car when we could really have used some extra hands, but for whatever reason didn’t want to get involved, ” he said. “I would hope that if I ever had an experienced something like that people would stop. But you can never have never a guarantee.”

He also wants to talk to the man he rescued and his family. Not to be intrusive; but rather, to ensure that they are all right.

“If I were to find out that he’s doing okay, and that [the family] will be okay, I’ll feel much better about the whole thing,” Walowy said.

If you have any information that can help Walowy locate the driver of the car that crashed Sunday or his family, he asked that you email him at [email protected].

JENKINS, PA — Former Cinnaminson Police Officer Michael Walowy and his friend George Hockins shared a car ride Sunday that neither will likely forget soon, if ever.

The trip that would take them from the southern tier of New York State to their homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, via the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, had been taken multiple times before.

Walowy and Hockins, a truck driver by trade, would normally stay in New York until Monday when they made these weekend trips, but Walowy told Patch this time was different.

“They were calling for thunderstorms on Monday. So we decided to come home early,” he said.

The pair were about halfway between Wilkes-Barre and Scranton when Walowy said something else unusual happened, this time involving the car in front of them and its male driver.

Find out what’s happening in Cinnaminsonwith free, real-time updates from Patch.
Your email address
Let’s go!
“All of a sudden, he veered off to the right, he struck the guardrail … we didn’t see any brake lights and he just kept going like he had his foot on the gas,” Walowy said. “He continued onto the grass up this incline, [hit] a berm or some type of a large bump in the ground, went airborne, landed and impacted a tree.”

Walowy said he and Hockins, who were driving parallel to the man’s path along the turnpike until the other driver crashed, thought the man had fallen asleep behind the wheel.

After Walowy called emergency dispatchers for help, he noticed a more urgent concern than ascertaining what led the driver to veer off the path that needed to be addressed.

“His car doors would not open,” he said of the car that crashed. “We were finally able to get the passenger side door open. We tried to pull him over the center console but he wasn’t budging … he was [incoherent] in his seat, which was jammed up against a steering wheel.”

The daunting task became even more frightening, according to Walowy.

“The grass had caught fire underneath the car … and it was burning up into the engine compartment,” he said. “We pulled him out of the car as the flames were coming up under the dash and up against the windshield … and then the whole car went up.”

He said a Pennsylvania Turnpike Authority worker, a person driving south on the turnpike, a couple who was also driving south on the turnpike — one of whom was a nurse, according to Walowy — as well as a fire department based nearby, a Pennsylvania State Trooper and local emergency medical response team all either stopped or responded to help.

Ultimately, the emergency medical response team took the man whose car crashed to the hospital.

Even so, Walowy said the harrowing experience left him shaking for the rest of the ride home.

The Moorestown native added that very few things he did while with the Cinnaminson Police Department from 1988 to 2009 (and with the Bordentown City Police Department from 1983 to his accepting the position in Cinnaminson) came close to what he and Hockins saw and did Sunday.

“My partner and I responded to a house fire [in Bordentown], made entry into the house and we got the owner and three dogs out,” Walowy said. “That was probably the only thing that was ever remotely close to this.”
Walowy was told the driver of the crashing car had a medical emergency and was listed in “fair” condition at a hospital in the Wilkes-Barre area. He said privacy laws keep him from learning other details.

(By several accounts, including nursa.org and a Florida newspaper, agreed that generally speaking, “fair” condition means that although a patient may be somewhat uncomfortable, his or her vital signs are within “normal limits” and the patient’s outlook is “favorable.”)

Walowy said several things about the events that unfolded on Sunday stand out a bit more than the others.

“I was … disappointed with the number of people who just kept driving by while we were out there trying to get this guy out of the car when we could really have used some extra hands, but for whatever reason didn’t want to get involved, ” he said. “I would hope that if I ever had an experienced something like that people would stop. But you can never have never a guarantee.”

He also wants to talk to the man he rescued and his family. Not to be intrusive; but rather, to ensure that they are all right.

“If I were to find out that he’s doing okay, and that [the family] will be okay, I’ll feel much better about the whole thing,” Walowy said.

If you have any information that can help Walowy locate the driver of the car that crashed Sunday or his family, he asked that you email him at [email protected].

Got a news tip? Story idea? Send me an email with the details at [email protected].

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